The Manhatten Project by Paul McNeive

This was an informed, detailed and realistically terrifying novel, with a solid main character and some heart-breaking motives.

Bioterrorism.
Real. Invisible. Devastating.
And it’s taking New York by storm.
With its insatiable hunger for fast food, easy fixes and life lived at breakneck speed, 
the city that never sleeps is hurtling towards disaster. Now John Wyse, an ordinary New York cop, looks set to be the only person who can thwart catastrophe on an apocalyptic scale …
New York City is under attack. Millions may die. But the enemy’s weapons are invisible, undetectable and creating terror at lightning speed. Now, there’s nothing to stand in their way …
A Hiroshima survivor turned criminal mastermind
A pharma industry riddled with corruption
A Libyan entrepreneur coerced by threats to his family
A New York cop falling fast for an elusive beauty
A visitor to Tokyo from the mountains of Afghanistan
One terrible desire for revenge connects them all. With the clock ticking on an audacious, devastating plot to bring America to its knees, can anyone save New York from catastrophe?

This novel was detailed, fast-paced and had a realistic connection to the Hiroshima tragedy. I felt that the characters were mainly well-written, although more attention was given to developing the character of Tsan Yohoto than John Wyse. Tsan’s past was clearly the contributing factor to his decisions, and for such a sensitive and devastating topic it was well written. His building anger at America, and the grief he was clearly unable to process were the ultimate combination of emotions. What was so horrifying about his plan was that it was so realistic, and it played on current fears and issues. The idea of bio-terrorism is not new, but this plan was so carefully thought out that it seemed like a threat no-one had planned for – as indeed they hadn’t.

There was quite a lot of science and medical detail involved, but I felt that McNeive used just the right amount of detail, while also simplifying it for the reader, in order to keep the reader interested. It felt technical to me, as someone with no science knowledge, but more importantly it felt believable. This is what made it so scary, as it felt like a situation that could actually happen.

Spoilers about to happen… What was surprisingly satisfying about this was that the plan actually succeeded. Normally, these sorts of plans are heroically discovered at the last second, and yay the world has been saved! What McNeive has cleverly done is show the realities of this threat, combining scenes from the police and doctors with stories of real people dying, whole families being wiped out and people suffering. It was honestly quite frightening to read, as no-one was safe. And yet, this is what made the novel so effective, as it highlighted the utter helplessness of America in this situation.

I also felt there was a lot of nuance in the novel, as there was a sense of awareness of race and ethnicity, and these were only brought into the story where relevant. One book I read recently was particularly bad at assuming the terrorist suspects had to look a certain way, but McNeive’s book is considerably more nuanced and different than this. One description of a suspect details not only his ethnicity, but also his height, clothes, backpack etc. and when John Wyse spots a potential fit for the suspect, it’s the clothes and backpack that lead him to this conclusion. This isn’t to say that race and ethnicity are ignored, as that would be equally unrealistic, rather that McNeive shows a good level of detail, bringing in a variety of views in discussions about Islam, demonstrating flawed thinking from police officers, but also offering characters that have a more open mindset.

The vast range of characters in this book can be quite hard to follow, but if enough attention is given towards understanding them all, it’s a very satisfying read, with lots of far-reaching connections, and a very surprising plot twist near the end. John Wyse is a very likeable detective. What I liked is that even though he is an intelligent character, and is naturally suspicious, there was no unrealistic sudden ‘light bulb moment’ solving the mystery at hand, more a sneaking suspicion that something is wrong and good old-fashioned detective work. Yes, towards the end there is more excitement and sudden revelations, but this worked really well and made the build-up much more exciting.

This is a terrifying, realistic and detailed book, set over the space of more than a year to show how a well thought out, but fundamentally morally wrong plan, comes to fruition. It shows the psychological consequences of real events from the world’s history, and the deep impact it has had on communities around the world. The genuinely upsetting first chapter sets up an emotional story, building to a frightening peak of terror, and ending with what I felt was an extremely satisfying ending. I would definitely recommend this to anyone looking to read a political thriller that’s a bit different. Without a doubt, a 5* star read.

The Manhatten Project
Paul McNeive
Black & White Publishing, 16th May 2019

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s