Fatal Fortune by Miranda Rijks

Thanks so much to Emma from @damppebbles for organising this blog tour!

Is someone trying to frame psychologist Pippa Durrant for the brutal murder of a woman she’s never even met?
It certainly seems that way when Pippa’s photo is found on the body of murdered lottery winner, Leanne Smith.
Pippa soon finds herself a suspect at the centre of a huge media storm. But she has an invaluable skill set – she is a human polygraph, expertly trained to spot lies and deceit. Skills she will need to help her to solve the mystery of who killed Leanne before it destroys her career – and her life.
But every cloud has a silver lining and this one arrives in the shape of DS Joe Swain. Initially suspicious of Pippa, he comes to trust her and to value her lie detection skills. Soon it’s clear there’s a definite spark between them….
Then, when another body turns up, Pippa realises her reputation isn’t the only thing in danger. Can she identify the killer before she becomes the next victim?

This book was definitely intriguing right from the start! There is seemingly no connection between Pippa, and the woman whose body her photo was left on. It’s genuinely quite mysterious and creepy, particularly the fact that they are described as looking alike.

I really liked Pippa as a character. She was really relatable and quite likeable, although also irritating at times – but then that’s what made her seem human. Her reaction to her photo being left on the body started as worried yet curious which turned into panic and fear – almost exactly as you’d imagine that situation would. She had a real determination to find out why she was being targeted like this, and I think the reader was really behind her the whole time, willing her to find out who was doing this. Her relationship with her son was interesting, and I feel like it’s something that will act as an over-arching storyline in future books.

The Smith family was a great opposing force to Pippa’s half of the story. Donna was kind of annoying, but you couldn’t help but feel intensely sorry for her after losing her mum. Watching her become more and more isolated and upset throughout the novel was hard, but again that’s what made her a relatable character. Her husband Ricky was super annoying, he was overly controlling and intense, and he did seem quite suspicious at times, but I never fully believed it was him either. He was clearly an emotional man, battling events and emotions from his past, and yet still trying to keep his family together in his own way. Their relationship was definitely a bit fractured, but there was clearly love there, which made later events of the novel really emotional.

I guessed who did it not too long before it was revealed, but it was definitely an interesting twist that I think worked really well. It linked it nicely with Pippa’s professional work, but also with her family life, so it had a definite personal touch. The character in question was brilliantly written, and it really was a sensitive and fascinating insight into mental health and personality.

I would definitely recommend this, and would love to read more Dr Pippa Durrant novels in the future!

BLOG TOUR: Catch Your Death by Kierney Scott

This was fast-paced, electrifying and super intense, and I thought the crime was a brilliantly written mystery.

There were five of them once. Now the others are all dead. And he’s next.
When FBI Agent Jess Bishop gets an urgent and scared phone call in the middle of the night, she sets off to Gracemount Academy, an extremely prestigious school. When she gets there, she finds the body of a young student, who has apparently taken his own life.
But she soon discovers that he’s not the only one. Five students have died within months of each other, all of them good friends.
Fighting her own inner demons from her past, Jess will stop at nothing to uncover the person behind these deaths, putting her own life on the line in the process. How far will she go to save more lives being taken?

Before I start my review, I just want to note that this is part of a series, but I read this as a standalone. I think I would have enjoyed this more if I had read the rest of the series, as there were clearly some intense backstories, but these were more or less explained throughout this novel.

The actual crime itself was truly sinister, and it soon became clear that there were some properly disturbing activities occurring both at the school and beyond it. The whole ‘undercover/secret society’ element of the mystery worked really well, and it just added to the chilling nature of the story. I’ve always loved stuff like this, and I thought that Scott played it perfectly, making it clear what this secret society was, but keeping whether or not it was involved questionable. It made for a really interesting read, as I was desperate to know the link between the deaths, and Scott added in a couple of clever side characters to add in extra layers of suspicion without it becoming ridiculous.

Jess was a fascinating main character. Her determination to succeed goes almost too far, and she’s actually quite frustrating at times for the reader, as she’s extremely stubborn. This, however, is exactly what makes her a brilliant agent, quick on her feet and an intelligent thinker, and her partnership with Jamison was really interesting. Again, there are clearly problems stemming from events in previous novels which would help the reader’s understanding of their relationship, but they’re still a great team. Jamison was a brilliantly stable character, contrasting Jess’s chaotic stubbornness really well, and at times their level of communication between each other was outstanding.

This was a brilliant novel, I thoroughly enjoyed it as a standalone, but will definitely be going back to read the full series.

BLOG TOUR: I Want You Gone by Miranda Rijks

This was SO good, really intense, fast-paced and genuinely creepy – the kind of creepy that gives you chills as you read it.

The only obituary you never want to read – is your own.
Laura Swallow is dead. 
A life cut tragically short, says the newspaper obituary.
But that’s a lie.
Estate agent Laura did not die in a car accident. She is alive and well.
At first, Laura thinks it’s a sick joke.
But multiple announcements of her death are followed by increasingly sinister real-life events. Already fragile, struggling to recover from a recent divorce, Laura is plunged into a living nightmare.
Who can she trust? Her new lover? Her clients and work colleagues? What about her ex-husband and his smug fiancée? Can Laura even rely on her best friends? And why is it that Laura’s present troubles are so tied up with her sister’s sudden death all those years ago?
But one thing Laura is sure of – someone out there wants her to suffer. Wants her gone.
Forever.

The reason I found this so creepy is that Laura is really easy to relate to in many ways, meaning that the story starts to feel real as well. It starts off with a Facebook post on Laura’s account claiming she has died, followed by a sinister obituary in the newspaper. It’s seriously weird, and the way Laura dismisses the first Facebook post as an odd error is genuinely believable, which is what helps to make it so sinister. The newspaper obituary escalates the situation a bit, and the sheer sense of weirdness surrounding Laura becomes inescapable.

What’s most distressing about this story is the total isolation that Laura feels and experiences throughout the novel – it’s actually really sad to read, and enhances the creepiness further. Laura’s a great character because she is so human – sometimes she’s so annoying because I just wanted her to see what was happening to her, but that’s why she’s a great character as her reactions to these events were realistic.

The other characters in this were brilliant as well. I liked that Miranda played with the reader a bit, making them suspicious of most of the other characters in the book. I would say that perhaps some of this felt a bit contrived, but I could definitely see what the author was trying to do in isolating Laura further by creating this aura of paranoia.

I guessed who was behind in about halfway through, but it didn’t necessarily ruin the book for me at all – the character in question was probably the best one in the book for me, very intriguing and hard to read and I wouldn’t have guessed the reasons behind their actions.

I thought this was an interesting read, I enjoyed the character-focused writing and would recommend if you’re looking for something a bit different to read!

Thanks to Emma from damppebbles for organising this book tour!

I Want You Gone
Miranda Rijks
Inkubator Books, 13th April 2019

BLOG TOUR: Her Best Friend’s Secret by Anna Mansell

Your best friend deserves the truth. But it will ruin her life. What would you do?
In summer, the small Cornish village of Gorran Haven fills with tourists, but in the colder months its pretty narrow streets are blissfully quiet, the bell on the village shop door rings only for locals, the beach is unspoilt, empty and safe.


It’s been over twenty years since four very different teenage girls sat on that beach, and swore to be best friends forever. Their lives went different ways after Emily left. But each remembered that promise. And none truly found friendship like it again.

Now, Emily’s back, with a secret she can’t face. She tries to hide away, take time to heal and make some difficult choices, but she runs into one of her old friends, and soon the four are reunited. Lolly, warm as ever, is a successful physiotherapist, married with kids. Yet smart, strong Amanda, who cherishes her teenage daughter, is alone and seemingly stuck in a dead-end job. And creative Jess is so much quieter than Emily remembers.

The bond is still there, and Emily realises their friendship might keep her together, but there are reasons why the women fell out of touch. Secrets that have lain dormant for decades start to surface, and then one of the women discovers a betrayal so big, it could turn each of their lives upside down.

It’s always those we’re closest to who have the power to tear us apart. Can friendship give Emily and her friends the strength to survive a devastating shock, or are some things unforgiveable?

Firstly, I LOVED this book. It had all the best elements of my favourite genres. There was the intrigue from a good drama (almost bordering on thriller-drama), the brilliantly written women, the little hints of romance, but most importantly, there was a great story.

I love books that are divided into character chapters, as it’s always super interesting to see different characters reacting to the same events. I thought Emily was a fascinating character, her sudden and quite dramatic lifestyle change really intrigued me, and her disillusionment with her movie star lifestyle was really interesting. Watching her come to terms with happiness by herself was seriously empowering, and her quiet confidence was actually quite inspiring.

Lolly was super sweet as well. I liked the fact that although she seemed naive, she was definitely more aware of what was going on around her than she seemed, and the twist at the end was super clever. Watching her relationship with her husband, and how it develops and changes throughout the book was one of the story lines that really hooked me in – despite it being quite subtle and almost slow-moving, there was a real sense of suspicion surrounding their marriage that kept me gripped.

Amanda was absolutely my favourite. What’s not to love about a strong, independent, unapologetic but caring and kind woman? She was completely brilliantly written, and despite having a somewhat unusual job she showed some moments of true humanity that made her really relatable. I thought that Mansell wrote Amanda seriously well and added in some finer details, such as her relationships with her daughter and her ex-husband, that warmed me to the character even more.

Jess was a clever final character, she was really relatable but provided a sort of grounding presence in the group. She did have her own dramas and problems happening throughout the book, but for some reason I found Jess a very reassuring person, as she was realistic, strong, and honest. Because of all these traits, I was super invested in her getting a happy ending, and loved watching her story play out.

This book surprised me as it wasn’t quite what I thought it was going to be, but then I loved it more than I thought! It was superbly written, with wonderfully complex but relatable characters, and I would 100% recommend this to anyone!

Her Best Friend’s Secret
Anna Mansell
Bookouture, 1st April 2019